Has Spring Already Sprung?

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(A sampling of high temperatures recorded Wednesday)
Jonathan Erdman
Senior Digital Meteorologist

Has Spring Already Sprung?

WeatherChannel.com

If you’re ready for spring, Groundhog Day can be the boost you’re looking for (even if Punxsutawney Phil has no predictive skill). But some of the warmth we’ve seen lately may leave you wondering if spring is already here.

One week ago, Washington hit 80 degrees, a mark the nation’s capital hadn’t recorded before in January or December. All-time January records were smashed this week in Boise, Idaho, (66 degrees) and Medford, Oregon (73). Even the “Icebox of the Nation” — International Falls, Minnesota — soared to 53 degrees Wednesday, the first time it had reached the 50s in January in 127 years.

It even reached 70 degrees in Saskatchewan, a provincial January record and second warmest of any Canadian location in January since 1950. That was just one of dozens of warm records set across western, central and northern Canada this week.

A bubble of high pressure aloft known as an omega block, as well as a lack of snow cover to reflect the sun’s energy, has led to this warm week. While there’s little change ahead in this extended thaw, there is a hint of a pattern change that could return colder weather for some later this month.

So, enjoy this preview of spring fever, if you can’t wait. Regardless of what a groundhog says, we still have just over six weeks of winter left.
Has Spring Already Sprung?

WeatherChannel.com

If you’re ready for spring, Groundhog Day can be the boost you’re looking for (even if Punxsutawney Phil has no predictive skill). But some of the warmth we’ve seen lately may leave you wondering if spring is already here.

One week ago, Washington hit 80 degrees, a mark the nation’s capital hadn’t recorded before in January or December. All-time January records were smashed this week in Boise, Idaho, (66 degrees) and Medford, Oregon (73). Even the “Icebox of the Nation” — International Falls, Minnesota — soared to 53 degrees Wednesday, the first time it had reached the 50s in January in 127 years.

It even reached 70 degrees in Saskatchewan, a provincial January record and second warmest of any Canadian location in January since 1950. That was just one of dozens of warm records set across western, central and northern Canada this week.

A bubble of high pressure aloft known as an omega block, as well as a lack of snow cover to reflect the sun’s energy, has led to this warm week. While there’s little change ahead in this extended thaw, there is a hint of a pattern change that could return colder weather for some later this month.

So, enjoy this preview of spring fever, if you can’t wait. Regardless of what a groundhog says, we still have just over six weeks of winter left.